USS Yorktown, CV-5, Commissioned 1937

Facebook Twitter Email

(Photo Naval History and Heritage Command)

On 30 September 1937, the USS Yorktown (CV-5) was commissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, commanded by Captain E. D. McWhorter, United States Navy. Construction of Yorktown was authorized under the National Industrial Recovery Act of 16 June 1933. Her keel was laid at Newport News Shipbuilding on 21 May 1934. She was christened on 04 April 1936 by Eleanor Roosevelt at Newport News, Virginia. Yorktown was instrumental in the important battles of Coral Sea and Midway in 1942. She earned 3 battle stars for her action. Damaged at Midway by Japanese aircraft on 04 June, she was being towed back to Pearl Harbor by USS Hammann (DD-412), when Japanese submarine I-168 fired four torpedoes on the afternoon of 06 June…one struck the destroyer USS Hammann and two hit Yorktown…the Hammann sank within minutes, Yorktown would sink earlier the next morning on 07 June 1942.

Two months later the Essex carrier being built at Newport News numbered CV-10 had her name changed from USS Bon Homme Richard to USS Yorktown…a legend would continue…

Taken from a launching Devastator TBD aircraft (Photo Navy History and Heritage Command)

Here is a newsreel showing early carrier battles of the Pacific!

(Photo Naval History and Heritage Command)

The end of a grand ship…(Photo Naval History and Heritage Command)

Facebook Twitter Email

2 thoughts on “USS Yorktown, CV-5, Commissioned 1937

  1. I watched the video about carrier “X” under fire. What was the real name of the carrier? Was it the Yorktown at Coral Sea?

    • Hi Glen,

      We checked with our Curator, and here’s what he said:

      Most of the footage is from ENTERPRISE CV-6 during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons (24-25 August 1942). The first aircraft carrier shown is HORNET CV-8 with a TBD leaving the deck (15 seconds into the film) at Midway (4-6 June 1942). The footage showing the bomb hit (1 minute mark) is inverted; the damage was on the starboard side aft on the flight deck, not port side as shown.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>