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“The Ship That Would Not Die” Served in the War That Has Not Ended – Truly Historic Blog

Chris Hauff Jun 26, 2020

Do you know which war the United States fought for the longest time? Technically, that would be the Korean War. The conflict is sometimes referred to as our “forgotten war.” Thursday, June 25, 2020, marked the 70th anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War. It’s been suspended since an armistice between North and South Korea was signed on July 27, 1953.

Since an armistice is a formal agreement of warring parties to stop fighting, it does not necessarily mean the end of a war. It may constitute only a cessation or stopping of hostilities while an attempt is made to negotiate a lasting peace.

The USS Laffey is most known for the attack sustained during WWII, but she also served in the Korean War.

Our museum ship USS Laffey, a destroyer, was named after Seaman Bartlett Laffey, a Medal of Honor recipient. The ship is most known for the attack it sustained while off of the coast of Okinawa during World War II. Laffey lost 32 members of her crew that day but kept on with the fight and determination of her crew. You can learn about the attack in the ship’s Mount 53 exhibit, where a re-creation of the kamikaze attacks makes visitors feel as if they were aboard the ship as it took place.

After World War II, the Laffey was recommissioned in 1951 and sent to the Korean Peninsula to take part in another war…the Korean War. She was part of the ship group protecting the American aircraft carriers USS Antietam and USS Valley Forge.

Today, we are honored to have the USS Laffey as part of our fleet of truly historic naval vessels for guests from all over the world to visit and learn about history up close and personal.

This tree honors the life of Gen. Douglas MacArthur.

It was an honor to visit South Korea a few years back with some other teachers.

You see my Dad served in Korea as an aircraft mechanic. We were amazed at how much the Korean people still respect and honor Americans so many years after the armistice – especially the veterans and their children. We saw many of their special sites and were even able to sit with many of the surviving veterans at the 64 Armistice Day Ceremony in South Korea.

Though North Korea has still not given up the fight, I am grateful that North

During the 64th Armistice Ceremony, I was able to visit the room where the agreement was signed.

Korean has returned the remains of some of the men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice. Their families were given a chance to find some closure. There are still over 5,300 Americans believed to be somewhere in North Korea.

 

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History Education Program Coordinator Cindy Clark (Miss Clark) comes out of the brig aboard the USS Yorktown.

Getting To Know Miss Clark:

My name is Cindy Clark, but most of my life as a teacher I’ve been known as Miss Clark. For more than 24 years, I was blessed to teach in a traditional classroom full of students who often taught me more than I taught them. Today, I am honored to be part of the Education Department aboard the USS Yorktown at the Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum, and boy is my classroom much BIGGER!!!

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